SALC

Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

SALC - Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

So / Neither

To indicate that something that someone said is true for you too, you can simply say, “Me too.” To say that a negative statement applies to you too, you can say “Me neither.”   In these types of situations we also sometimes use so or neither with auxiliary verbs and pronouns.

 

SO

SO is used to show agreement with positive statements.

SO + Auxiliary + Subject (pronoun)

The Auxiliary needs to agree with the verb tense in the original statement.

It is similar to using TOO at the end of a sentence.

Person A Person B
I am happy. So am I. = I am happy too.
I‘m going to Brazil in the summer. So am I. = I am going to Brazil too.
You look nice today. So do you. = You look nice too.
Stephanie has a new boyfriend. So does Mary. = Mary has a new one too.
We went to the concert last night. So did I. = I went to the concert too.
I would love a coffee right now. So would I. = I would love a coffee too.
He will win a prize. So will I. = I will win one too.
They have finished their homework. So have I. = I have finished too.
I can speak two languages. So can I. = I can speak two too.
He should study more. So should I. = I should study more too.
We could see the mountains. So could we. = We could see them too.
My brother had eaten too much. So had I. = I had eaten too much too.

 

NEITHER

Neither is used to show agreement with negative statements.

Neither + Auxiliary + Subject (pronoun)

The Auxiliary needs to agree with the verb tense in the original statement.

It is similar to using either at the end of a sentence, although Neither is more commonly used, especially in spoken English.

A: I don’t understand Spanish.
B: Neither do I. (= I don’t understand Spanish either.)

A: I cannot swim.
B: Neither can I. (= I can’t swim either.)

Sometimes people respond Me Neither instead of Neither + Auxiliary + Subject though this is very informal in spoken English.

Person A Person B
I am not hungry. Neither am I. = I’m not hungry either
I‘m not going to quit. Neither am I. = I’m not going to quit either
They don’t speak French. Neither do I. = I don’t speak French either.
Stephanie doesn’t eat meat. Neither does Mary. = Mary doesn’t eat meat either.
Mary didn’t go to the party. Neither did I. = I didn’t go either.
I wouldn’t like to do his job. Neither would I. = I wouldn’t like to do it either.
He won’t stop talking. Neither will you. = You won’t stop either.
You haven’t finished your meal. Neither have you. = You haven’t finished either.
Mike can’t reach the top shelf. Neither can I. = I can’t reach it either.
You shouldn’t talk in the movie. Neither should you. = You shouldn’t talk either.
We couldn’t hear him. Neither could we. = We couldn’t hear him either.
I hadn’t seen her before. Neither had I. = I hadn’t seen her before either.

 

If you want more information, here is a very useful LINK , when you finish reviewing, try these exercises to check your understanding:

 

http://www.usingenglish.com/quizzes/68.html8140988-Ein-Smiling-Female-Teacher-die-Diskussion-ber-den-Inhalt-eines-Buches--Stockfoto

http://www.tolearnenglish.com/exercises/exercise-english-2/exercise-english-49198.php

http://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/so-too-neither-either-exercise-1.html

http://usefulenglish.ru/phrases/phrases-exercise-six

http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/soneither1.php

http://www.eflnet.com/grammar/soneither2.php

 

Noun Phrases

A noun phrase includes a noun —a person, place, or thing— and the modifiers which distinguish it.

You can find the noun dog in a sentence, for example, but you don’t know which canine the writer means until you consider the entire noun phrase:

That dog, Aunt Audrey’s dog, the dog on the sofa, the neighbor’s dog that chases our cat, the dog digging in the new flower bed.

Modifiers can come before or after the noun. Ones that come before might include articles, possessive nouns, possessive pronouns, adjectives, and/or participles.

Articles: a dog, the dog

Possessive nouns:Aunt Audrey’s dog, the neighbor’s dog, the police officer’sdog

Possessive pronouns:our dog, her dog, their dog

Adjectives:that dog, the big dog, the spotted dog

Participles: the drooling dog, the barking dog, the well trained dog

Modifiers that come after the noun might include prepositional phrases, adjective clauses, participle phrases, and/or infinitives.

Prepositional phrases: a dog on the loose, the dog in the front seat, the dogbehind the fence

Adjective clauses: the dog that chases cats, the dog that looks lost, the dogthat won the championship

Participle phrases: the dog whining for a treat, the dog clipped at the grooming salon, the dog walked daily

Infinitives: the dog to catch, the dog to train, the dog to adopt

Less frequently, a noun phrase will have a pronoun as its base—a word like we,everybody, etc.—and the modifiers which distinguish it. Read these examples:

We who were green with envy

We = subject pronoun; who were green with envy = modifier.

Someone intelligent

Someone = indefinite pronoun; intelligent = modifier.

No one important

No one = indefinite pronoun; important = modifier.

In case you need more information about noun phrases here is a page that explains more about the topic, clik in the link below:

 http://www.grammar-quizzes.com/nounphrase.html

And here are some exercises for you to practice noun phrases:

http://aeo.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/Files/NounPhrases/Noun%20Phrases.html

 http://aeo.sllf.qmul.ac.uk/Files/NounPhrases/Noun%20Phrases.html

 

 

A-HA – Take on Me

“Take On Me” is a song by the Norwegian synthpop band A-ha. Written by the band members, the song was produced by Alan Tarney for the group’s debut studio album Hunting High and Low (1985). The song combines synthpop with a varied instrumentation that includes acoustic guitars, keyboards and drums.

You can listen to this wonderful song and practice your listening comprehension. Just watch the video and answer some questions!

A-HA, Take on Me

Start
Congratulations - you have completed A-HA, Take on Me . You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
6789End
Return

Taylor Swift, Blank Space

Blank Space” is a song by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift from her fifth studio album 1989 (2014). It was written by Taylor Swift, Max Martin and Shellback. Musically, “Blank Space” is a minimalist electropop song with lyrics that satirize the media’s perception of Swift and her relationships.

You can listen to this wonderful song and practice your listening comprehension. Just watch the video and answer some questions!

TAYLOR SWIFT, BLANK SPACE

Start
Congratulations - you have completed TAYLOR SWIFT, BLANK SPACE. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678910
1112131415
1617181920
2122232425
2627282930
3132333435
36End
Return

For and Since

We often use for and since when talking about time.

for + period: a “period” is a duration of time – five minutes, two weeks, six years. For means “from the beginning of the period to the end of the period”.

since + point: a “point” is a precise moment in time – 9 o’clock, 1st January, Monday. Since means “from a point in the past until now”.

 

Look at these examples:

for
a period
from start to end
since
a point
from then to now
>===< x===>|
for 20 minutes
for three days
for 6 months
for 4 years
for 2 centuries
for a long time
for ever
since 9am
since Monday
since January
since 1997
since 1500
since I left school
since the beginning of time
all tenses perfect tenses

 

 
images  Here´s a link if you want more information, Click here!

 

 

 

Both for and since also have other meanings, with no reference to time. Here are some examples:

  • This is for you.
  • Is this the train for London?
  • Since you ask, I’ll say yes.
  • Since he didn’t study, he didn’t pass the exam.

 

Now you are ready for practicing with these exercises below:

https://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verbs-m_for-since_quiz.htm

https://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/vocabulary/since-for

http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises/confusing_words/since_for.htm

http://www.nspeak.com/newbasic/grammatica/esercizio20.htm

http://www.english-grammar-lessons.com/presentperfectcontinuous/exercise4.swf

 

for-and-since

 

 

 

 

Connecteurs

Argumenter un texte / Développer une idée

 

Les mots de liaison, les formules d’introduction sont des éléments essentiels pour développer son discours écrit ou oral.

Ce cours n’a pas la prétention de tous vous les donner; loin de là mais c’est une première approche qui vous aidera à vous sentir plus à l’aise face à une situation d’examen. Bon apprentissage!

Cliquez sur l’image!