SALC

Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

SALC - Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

READING COMPREHENSION INT/ADV LEVELS

STEP 1 – Read the following article:

 Using Real Animals in Moviesapes

At the premiere of “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”, a clutch of impassioned animal activists gathered on Hollywood Boulevard. But they weren’t there to throw red paint on fur-coat-wearing celebrities. Instead, one demonstrator — dressed in a full-body monkey suit — had arrived with a sign complimenting the filmmakers: “Thanks for not using real apes!” 

The creative team behind “Apes” used motion-capture technology to create digitalized primates, spending tens of millions of dollars on technology that records an actor’s performance and later layers it with computer graphics to create a final image — in this case, one of a realistic-looking ape. 

Yet “Apes” is more exception than the rule — in fact, Hollywood has been hot on live animals lately: The nonprofit American Humane Assn., which monitors the treatment of animals in filmed entertainment, is keeping tabs on more than 2,000 productions this year, 100 more than in 2010. Already, a number of high-profile 2011 films, including “Water for Elephants,” “The Hangover Part II” and “Zookeeper,” have drawn the ire of activists who say the creatures featured in them haven’t been treated properly. 

In some cases, it’s not so much the treatment of the animals on set that has activists worried; it’s the off-set training and living conditions that are raising concerns. And there are questions about U.S. films made overseas, which sometimes are not monitored as closely as productions filmed stateside. 

STEP 2 – Answer these questions (choose the best answer):

Quiz Planet of the Apes

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GAME TO PRACTICE VOCABULARY BEGINNER-ADVANCED LEVELS

If you like action-packed ESL games that have you working against the clock, Wordshake is right for you.

This game gives you 16 random letters of the alphabet and three minutes. During that time, you have to come up with as many English words as you can using the letters you have, and every time you make a new word, you get a point.

The letters don’t have to touch each other or be in a particular pattern like they do in crossword puzzles, and you’re able to select letters in any order.

WORDSHAKE

Reading Comprehension (Advanced Level)

 

 

READING

 

 

CLICK ON THE LINKS TO PRACTICE YOUR READING SKILLS.

Cheating and Plagiarism

Education & Learning | Multiple Choice & True/False
Dirty Britain

Environment & Nature | Multiple Choice & True/False
English as a National Foreign Language in India

Education & Learning | Multiple Choice & True/False
Gender bias and poverty

Politics | Cloze / Gap Fill
HIV Breakthrough

Health | Cloze / Gap Fill
Mark Rothko

Culture & Travel | Multiple Choice & True/False
The Great Wall of China

Culture & Travel | Multiple Choice & True/False

Mixed Conditional

MIXED CONDITIONAL

It is possible for the two parts of a conditional sentence to refer to different times, and the resulting sentence is a “mixed conditional” sentence. There are two types of mixed conditional sentence.

PRESENT RESULT OF A PAST CONDITION

FORM

In this type of mixed conditional sentence, the tense in the ‘if’ clause is the past perfect, and the tense in the main clause is the present conditional.

If clause (condition) Main clause (result)
If + past perfect present conditional
If this thing had happened that thing would happen.

As in all conditional sentences, the order of the clauses is not fixed. You may have to rearrange the pronouns and adjust punctuation when you change the order of the clauses, but the meaning is identical.

EXAMPLES
  • If I had worked harder at school, I would have a better job now.
  • I would have a better job now if I had worked harder at school.
  • If we had looked at the map we wouldn’t be lost.
  • We wouldn’t be lost if we had looked at the map.
  • If you had caught that plane you would be dead now.
  • You would be dead now if you had caught that plane.
FUNCTION

This type of mixed conditional refers to an unreal past condition and its probable result in the present. These sentences express a situation which is contrary to reality both in the past and in the present. In these mixed conditional sentences, the time is the past in the “if” clause and in the presentin the main clause.

EXAMPLES
  • If I had studied I would have my driving license. (but I didn’t study and now I don’t have my license)
  • I would be a millionaire now if I had taken that job. (but I didn’t take the job and I’m not a millionaire)
  • If you had spent all your money, you wouldn’t buy this jacket. (but you didn’t spend all your money and now you can buy this jacket)

In these mixed conditional sentences, you can also use modals in the main clause instead of would to express the degree of certainty, permission, or a recommendation about the outcome.

EXAMPLES
  • If you had crashed the car, you might be in trouble.
  • I could be a millionaire now if I had invested in ABC Plumbing.
  • If I had learned to ski, I might be on the slopes right now.

PAST RESULT OF PRESENT OR CONTINUING CONDITION

FORM

In this second type of mixed conditional sentence, the tense in the ‘if’ clause is the simple past, and the tense in the main clause is the perfect conditional.

If clause (condition) Main clause (result)
If + simple past perfect conditional
If this thing happened that thing would have happened.

As in all conditional sentences, the order of the clauses is not fixed. You may have to rearrange the pronouns and adjust punctuation when you change the order of the clauses, but the meaning is identical.

EXAMPLES
  • If I wasn’t afraid of spiders, I would have picked it up.
  • I would have picked it up if I wasn’t afraid of spiders.
  • If we didn’t trust him we would have sacked him months ago.
  • We would have sacked him months ago if we didn’t trust him.
  • If I wasn’t in the middle of another meeting, I would have been happy to help you.
  • I would have been happy to help you if I wasn’t in the middle of another meeting.
FUNCTION

These mixed conditional sentences refer to an unreal present situation and its probable (but unreal) past result. In these mixed conditional sentences, the time in the if clause is now or always and the time in the main clause is before now. For example, “If I wasn’t afraid of spiders” is contrary to present reality. I am afraid of spiders. “I would have picked it up” is contrary to past reality. I didn’t pick it up.

EXAMPLES
  • If she wasn’t afraid of flying she wouldn’t have travelled by boat.
  • I’d have been able to translate the letter if my Italian was better.
  • If I was a good cook, I’d have invited them to lunch.
  • If the elephant wasn’t in love with the mouse, she’d have trodden on him by now.

Now Practice

Mixed Conditionals

COMPARATIVES and SUPERLATIVES

COMPARATIVES

Comparatives are used to compare two things.

For one-syllable adjectives: adjective –er + than

He is taller than his cousin.

For two or more syllable adjectives: more + adjective + than (to show the opposite use less instead of more before the adjective).

This ring is more expensive than that one.

For adjectives ending in ‘y’: drop the ‘y’ and adjective –ier + than

She is funnier than him.

There are exceptions – good (better), bad (worse), far(further/farther), etc.

If the second person or thing being compared isn’t mentioned in the sentence, we drop than.

Which is more important, money or power? I think money is more important.

We can also use comparatives to compare one person or thing with all the rest of the people or things in their group.

John is more diligent than all of his classmates.

 

SUPERLATIVES

Superlatives are used to compare a person or thing with every other person or thing in the same group.

For 1 syllable adjectives: the + adjective –est

He is the tallest member of his family.

For 2 or more syllable adjectives: the + most + adjective (to show the opposite use least instead of most before the adjective)

This ring is the most expensive ring in the store.

For adjectives ending in y: drop the y and use the + adjective –iest

She is the funniest person here.

There are exceptions – good (best)bad (worst)far (furthest/farthest), etc.

 

Practice 1

Practice 2