SALC

Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

SALC - Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

Visual dictionary!

77280__unopt__safe_twilight

Are you working on a project for your English class? Maybe an Essay, a document or just want to know about different options for you to find words, Here is a Visual Dictionary online, which help you understand and verify different words, How can you use it? Once you get in the webpage (clicking in the picture below) you will see it has several categories such as

You will be able to check each category of your interest and as well to help you in the future ☺ Let us know what do you think about this link in a comment, we would love to know!

CLICK IN THE PICTURE BELOW TO CHECK THIS SITE!

Phrasal Verbs

A phrasal verb consists of a verb and a preposition or adverb that modifies or changes the meaning forming a single semantic unit. This semantic unit cannot be understood based upon the meanings of the individual parts in isolation, but rather it can be taken as a whole.

Ex:  ‘give up’ is a phrasal verb that means ‘stop doing’ something, which is very different from ‘give’.phrasal-verbs

 

 

Common verbs with their most frequent particles are:

 

bring: about, along, back, forward, in, off, out, round, up
buy: out, up
call: off, up
carry: off, out
cut: back, down, off, out, up
give: away, back, off
hand: back, down, in, on out, over, round
knock: down, out, over
leave: behind, out
let: down, in, off, out
pass: down, over, round
point: out
push: about, around, over
put: across, away, down, forward, off, on, out, through, together, up
read: out
set: apart, aside, back, down
shut: away, in, off, out
take: apart, away, back, down, in, on, up, over
think: over, through, up

 

  • Some phrasal verbs are intransitive. An intransitive verb cannot be followed by an object:

Example:
He suddenly showed up.  (“show up” cannot take an object)

  • Some phrasal verbs are transitive. A transitive verb can be followed by an object:

Example:
I made up the story. (“story” is the object of “make up”)

  • Some transitive phrasal verbs are separable. The object is placed between the verb and the preposition. In this Phrasal Verb Dictionary, separable phrasal verbs are marked by placing a * between the verb and the preposition / adverb:

Example:
I talked my mother into letting me borrow the car.
She looked the phone number up.

  • Some transitive phrasal verbs are inseparable. The object is placed after the preposition. In this Phrasal Verb Dictionary, inseparable phrasal verbs are marked by placing a + after the preposition / adverb:

Example:
I ran into an old friend yesterday.
They are looking into the problem.

  • Some transitive phrasal verbs can take an object in both places:

Example:
I looked the number up in the phone book.
I looked up the number in the phone book.

 

WARNING! Although many phrasal verbs can take an object in both places, you must put the object between the verb and the preposition if the object is a pronoun:

Example:
I looked the number up in the phone book.
I looked up the number in the phone book.
I looked it up in the phone book.

 

In this web site, you can find a  list  about 200 common phrasal verbs, with meanings and examples:

https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/phrasal-verbs-list.htm

 

Here is a very useful dictionary of English Phrasal Verbs:

UsingEnglish.com

 

Now you are ready for practicing with these online quizzes:

http://www.englishpage.com/prepositions/prepositions.html (a menu of exercises)

http://www.myenglishpages.com/site_php_files/grammar-exercise-phrasal-verbs.php

 

phrasal_verbs