SALC

Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

SALC - Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

“Selfie” – Short Horror Film

 

"Selfie"

Start
Congratulations - you have completed "Selfie". You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
67End
Return

“Mockingbird” – Horror Short Film

 

"Mockingbird"

Start
Congratulations - you have completed "Mockingbird". You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
6End
Return

Horror Quiz

scared

How much do you know about horror movies? Don’t be afraid and take our quiz dedicated for hardcore horror movie fans!

 

Horror Movies Quiz

Start
Congratulations - you have completed Horror Movies Quiz. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678910
1112131415
End
Return

Reading: The Weirdest Superstitions From 13 Countries

There are some things you should never, ever do in different countries (because they’ll give you the worst of luck)!

 

“No, dude! Don’t step on the cracks in the sidewalk! It’s bad luck!”
– George Washington

 

Germany


In Germany, you can’t congratulate a person before their actual birthday. This superstition goes back to the scary-ghosts-halloween-cartoon-clip-artbelief that demons could hear the good wishes and consequently do their best to make them not come true. But even when it’s midnight, and you’re finally allowed to congratulate your German friends, party-related danger still lurks around the corner: When you make a toast to them, you’ll have to look everyone straight in the eyes when you clink glasses. This way, you’ll make sure that a) there’s no poison in your drink, the origin of this superstition, and b) your love life won’t be ruined for the next 7 years.

 

Great Britain

If you see a magpie in Great Britain, you better greet them politely: “Good morning, Mr. Magpie. How is your lady wife today?” Forget this little greeting and bad luck will follow you for the rest of the day. This tradition probably comes from the fact that magpies are usually found in pairs, so a lone magpie means sadness. If you add, “One for sorrow, two for joy!” to your greeting, you’ll further ensure that the magpie will be friendly and won’t steal any of your shiny belongings.

 

Poland

Bags have no business being on the ground in Poland because money can easily jump out from there. And you know how they say, “Time is money?” Well, in Poland, that should be, “Time is life.” If someone dies, you should bury them before the next Sunday. Otherwise, the next death in your circle will soon follow.

 

Spain

happy-friday-13th-by-policegirl01-on-deviantart-np4ahg-clipartWhile Friday the 13th is unlucky in many countries, the unlucky day in Spain is Tuesday the 13th! This is why you should never, ever get married or travel on a Tuesday that lands on the 13th. The movie Friday the 13th was still translated as Viernes 13 though, and not re-named Martes 13.

 

Italy

Speaking of unlucky days: In Italy, Friday the 17th is always bad news. This is why you basically shouldn’t do anything on that day, least of all celebrate a special event. If you do (but why would you?!), then please, for heaven’s sake, do not wear any purple! Are you getting paler and paler because you’re reading this on Friday the 17th, at a wedding, wearing your best purple suit? Don’t worry, you can easily combat your bad luck: If you’re a woman, touch your left breast with your right hand (shake a bit for extra luck), and if you’re a man you just have to touch your… well, maybe don’t! After all, it might just be better to risk bad luck instead of almost certainly shaming yourself in front of the other wedding guests.

 

Sweden

Killing a spider is a no-go in Sweden, unless you want it to rain the next day (so don’t ruin it for everyone). However, before you escape your spider-infested house, be aware that it might be even more dangerous outside: There are two kinds of manhole covers in Sweden, one with an “A” on it, and one with a “K” on it. You should always look carefully and never, ever step on one that has an “A” on it. The “A” can stand for a number of unpleasant things like avbruten kärlek (“discontinued love”) or arbetslöshet (“unemployment”)! That house full of spiders doesn’t look so bad now…

 

France

raven_in_moonlight_rightThat’s what you thought, at least! But not so fast! In France, there’s the saying: Araignée du matin : chagrin — “Spider in the morning: sorrow.” Other animals can cause harm as well: If a bird looks through your window, something bad will happen. So it’s better not to attract birds, especially with bread that’s lying upside down on the table. Such an innocent looking upside-down loaf of bread can easily attract the devil!

 

Turkey

In Turkey, to give a knife or a pair of scissors directly to someone means that you will fight or even become enemies. This is why you should put these things on the table or floor, so that they can be picked up without being handed over. If someone should still give you a knife or scissors directly (thereby making you their enemy), you can get your revenge by planting a fig tree in front of their house. Having a fig tree in front of your house is bad luck, but so is cutting them down! There is even a saying: Ocağıma incir ağacı diktin — “You planted a fig tree in my home.”

 

Russia

In Russia, you should avoid going back to your house if you forgot something. (“But I forgot my suitcase, and I’m on the way to the airport!”) Erm… how did you manage to forget an entire suitcase? Okay, so if you have to go back, just make sure not to whistle inside (or you will lose your money). So here’s what you do: Sit on your suitcase (to trick the demons into thinking that you won’t be traveling for a while) and look into the mirror before you go back out — bonus luck points if you stick out your tongue while you’re at it!

 

Brazil

In Brazil, superstitions serve as evidence of the country’s rich cultural mixture: Superstitions like making the sign of the cross when you walk by a graveyard — which clearly came from European settlers — coexist with local ones like not pointing at stars (because this will give you warts on your fingers).

 

Japan

0-9-handwritten-4Counting can turn into dangerous business pretty quickly in Japan. The number 4 for example, pronounced [shi], can also mean “death.” This is why you should avoid gifts consisting of four things (four flowers, tableware in sets of four) at all costs! Often, apartment buildings will skip the fourth floor and apartment numbers containing the number 4 for the same reason. The number 9 is almost as bad, because it’s pronounced [ku] — the same as the word for “suffering.”

 

Vietnam

In Vietnam, skincare is almost spiritual: You should never sleep with make-up on your face, or demons might think you’re one of them!

 

South Korea

Whistling at night is bad luck in South Korea because it might make ghosts and bad spirits notice your presence. Writing can be another dangerous evening activity. Just think what would happen if you accidentally grabbed the wrong ink pot in the dark and wrote a person’s name in red! You’d basically be signing their death warrant, since the wooden sticks and tombstones on Buddhist graves have red writing on them!

 

Source: babbel.com

Bet You Didn’t Know: Halloween

pumpkin

BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW: HALLOWEEN

Start
Congratulations - you have completed BET YOU DIDN'T KNOW: HALLOWEEN. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678End
Return

Vocabulary: Halloween

halloween-aktiviteter-til-festen-idebank-for-0ksulm-clipart

 

ENGLISH

SPANISH

Mummy

Momia

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

A black cat

Un gato negro

Scarecrow

Espantapájaros
Cauldron

Caldero

A ghost / phantom

Un fantasma

An spirit

Un espíritu

A soul

Un alma

A witch

Una bruja
A witch hat

Un sombrero de bruja

Bat

Murciélago
Skeleton

Un esqueleto

Coffin

Ataúd

Werewolf

Hombre lobo
Candies / Sweets

Dulces

Children

Niños
Costumes

Disfraces

A Halloween party

Fiesta de Halloween
A mask

Una máscara

Trick or treat

Dulce o truco
Pumpkin

Calabaza

Haunted House

Casa embrujada
An spider

Una araña

A vampire

Un vampiro
A monster

Un mounstro

Web

Telaraña
Horror story / movie

Historia / Película de terror

A zombie

Un zombie
Blood

Sangre

Fangs

Colmillos
Creppy

Horripilante

Jack or Lantern

Linterna (de Halloween)

History of Halloween

Read the text and decide whether the sentences are true or false.

 

Like many other holidays, Halloween has evolved and changed throughout history. Over 2,000 years ago people called the Celts lived in what is now Ireland, the UK, and parts of Northern France. November 1 was their New Year’s Day. They believed that the night before the New Year (October 31) was a time when the living and the dead came together.

More than a thousand years ago the Christian church named November 1 All Saints Day (also called All Hallows.) This was a special holy day to honor the saints and other people who died for their religion. The night before All Hallows was called Hallows Eve. Later the name was changed to Halloween.search-terms-halloween-silhouette-bat-bats-black-and-white-473637


Like the Celts, the Europeans of that time also believed that the spirits of the dead would visit the earth on Halloween. They worried that evil spirits would cause problems or hurt them. So on that night people wore costumes that looked like ghosts or other evil creatures. They thought if they dressed like that, the spirits would think they were also dead and not harm them.

The tradition of Halloween was carried to America by the immigrating Europeans. Some of the traditions changed a little, though. For example, on Halloween in Europe some people would carry lanterns made from turnips. In America, pumpkins were more common. So people began putting candles inside them and using them as lanterns. That is why you see Jack ‘o lanterns today.

These days Halloween is not usually considered a religious holiday. It is primarily a fun day for young people. Children dress up in costumes like people did a thousand years ago. But instead of worrying about evil spirits, they go from house to house. They knock on doors and say “trick or treat.” The owner of each house gives candy or something special to each trick or treater.

halloween-1008165_960_720

True or false?

Start
Congratulations - you have completed True or false?. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678End
Return