SALC

Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

SALC - Here are some suggestions on how to use the SALC to practice and learn languages.

Mixed Conditional

MIXED CONDITIONAL

It is possible for the two parts of a conditional sentence to refer to different times, and the resulting sentence is a “mixed conditional” sentence. There are two types of mixed conditional sentence.

PRESENT RESULT OF A PAST CONDITION

FORM

In this type of mixed conditional sentence, the tense in the ‘if’ clause is the past perfect, and the tense in the main clause is the present conditional.

If clause (condition) Main clause (result)
If + past perfect present conditional
If this thing had happened that thing would happen.

As in all conditional sentences, the order of the clauses is not fixed. You may have to rearrange the pronouns and adjust punctuation when you change the order of the clauses, but the meaning is identical.

EXAMPLES
  • If I had worked harder at school, I would have a better job now.
  • I would have a better job now if I had worked harder at school.
  • If we had looked at the map we wouldn’t be lost.
  • We wouldn’t be lost if we had looked at the map.
  • If you had caught that plane you would be dead now.
  • You would be dead now if you had caught that plane.
FUNCTION

This type of mixed conditional refers to an unreal past condition and its probable result in the present. These sentences express a situation which is contrary to reality both in the past and in the present. In these mixed conditional sentences, the time is the past in the “if” clause and in the presentin the main clause.

EXAMPLES
  • If I had studied I would have my driving license. (but I didn’t study and now I don’t have my license)
  • I would be a millionaire now if I had taken that job. (but I didn’t take the job and I’m not a millionaire)
  • If you had spent all your money, you wouldn’t buy this jacket. (but you didn’t spend all your money and now you can buy this jacket)

In these mixed conditional sentences, you can also use modals in the main clause instead of would to express the degree of certainty, permission, or a recommendation about the outcome.

EXAMPLES
  • If you had crashed the car, you might be in trouble.
  • I could be a millionaire now if I had invested in ABC Plumbing.
  • If I had learned to ski, I might be on the slopes right now.

PAST RESULT OF PRESENT OR CONTINUING CONDITION

FORM

In this second type of mixed conditional sentence, the tense in the ‘if’ clause is the simple past, and the tense in the main clause is the perfect conditional.

If clause (condition) Main clause (result)
If + simple past perfect conditional
If this thing happened that thing would have happened.

As in all conditional sentences, the order of the clauses is not fixed. You may have to rearrange the pronouns and adjust punctuation when you change the order of the clauses, but the meaning is identical.

EXAMPLES
  • If I wasn’t afraid of spiders, I would have picked it up.
  • I would have picked it up if I wasn’t afraid of spiders.
  • If we didn’t trust him we would have sacked him months ago.
  • We would have sacked him months ago if we didn’t trust him.
  • If I wasn’t in the middle of another meeting, I would have been happy to help you.
  • I would have been happy to help you if I wasn’t in the middle of another meeting.
FUNCTION

These mixed conditional sentences refer to an unreal present situation and its probable (but unreal) past result. In these mixed conditional sentences, the time in the if clause is now or always and the time in the main clause is before now. For example, “If I wasn’t afraid of spiders” is contrary to present reality. I am afraid of spiders. “I would have picked it up” is contrary to past reality. I didn’t pick it up.

EXAMPLES
  • If she wasn’t afraid of flying she wouldn’t have travelled by boat.
  • I’d have been able to translate the letter if my Italian was better.
  • If I was a good cook, I’d have invited them to lunch.
  • If the elephant wasn’t in love with the mouse, she’d have trodden on him by now.

Now Practice

Mixed Conditionals

Exprimer la condition ou des hypothèses avec “si” en français

EXPLICATION

Phrases avec ” si “

Si + présent de l’indicatif, verbe au présent, au futur ou à l’impératif

  • Si tu viens, je mange du chocolat
  • Si tu viens, on s’amusera
  • Si tu viens, téléphone-moi

Valeur : une action se réalisera dans le présent ou le futur à contidion qu’une autre se réalise.

Si + imparfait, verbe au conditionnel présent

  • Si j’allais  à Paris, j’irais tous les jours voir un spectacle. (L’hypothèse se situe dans le présent ou le futur, l’action envisagée a peu de chances de se réaliser)
  • Si j’étais d’origine chinoise, je parlerais sûrement. (L’action se situe dans le présent mais l’action hypothétique est irréalisable)

Si+ plus-que-parfait, verbe au conditionnel passé

S’il m’avait téléphoné, je lui aurais expliqué la situation (L’hypothèse est située dans le passé et l’action envisagée ne s’est pas réalisée)

Conjonctions

À condition que+ subjonctif ( valeur générale). Exemple : Je te prêterai mon livre à condition que tu me le rendes demain.

Pourvu que + subjonctif (condition nécessaire). Exemple : Vous pourrez voyager pourvu que la SNCF ne fasse pas de grève.

Pour peu que + subjonctif (condition minimale). Exemple : Elle rougit pour peu qu’on lui fasse un compliment.

À supposer que/ En attendant que + subjonctif  (Hypothèse choisie par le locuteur). Exemple : À supposer qu’il ne vienne pas, nous ajournerons la conférence.

Au cas où + conditionnel (Hypothèse qui ne dépend pas du locuteur). Exemple : Nous resterons à l’hôtel au cas où il pleuvrait.

MAINTENANT, EXERCE-TOI

Clique pour réviser le conditionnel présent en deux minutes

Clique pour réviser l´imparfait en trois minutes

Exercice d´association

Ecoute les portraits chinois et devine qui c´est

D´autres portraits chinois à lire

Crée ton portrait chinois et partage-le!

Exercice : écris le verbe à la forme correcte

Même exercice

PRATIQUE CE THEME EN CHANSONS! chanter

Mourir demain – Natasha St Pier et Pascal Obispo

Si j´étais un homme – Diane Tell

Si – Zaz. Ecoute et fais l´exercice sur la droite.

Et si tu n´existais pas – Willy Denzey. Ecoute et fais l´exercice.

Si j´étais Président – Gérard Lenorman

Si j´étais elle – Julien Clerc

 

Le conditionnel en français

Pour former le conditionnel présent, on prend généralement l’infinitif et on ajoute  –ais, ais, ait, ions, iez, aient.

Exemples :

finir = je finirais, tu finirais, il finirait, nous finirions, vous finiriez, ils finiraient

chanter = je chanterais, tu chanterais, il chanterait, nous chanterions, vous chanteriez, ils chanteraient

Pour en savoir plus, clique ici

Explication en vidéo

Futur ou conditionnel présent? Lis et fais l´exercice

Le conditionnel : complete et écoute

Conditionnel et imparfait

Reading Comprehesion Practice Tests

Exams are coming!

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But wait! You don’t have to worry, here we share very useful practice tests that will help you strengthen your reading comprehension skills and take your exams easy

The first practice test contains 45 questions divided in 9 passages. All you have to do is read the text and answer the questions according to what it is stated in the passage. At the bottom of the page you can check the correct answers.

The second one is for practicing your speed reading. You will get your reading speed as soon as you have finished your timed reading. You may then perform a comprehension test with a series of questions about the text you have just read.

 

Reading Comprehesion Practice Test

 

Speed Reading Test

 

Ready to get a 10? Good luck!

Present perfect Vs. Simple past

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ONLINE PRACTICE

 

LISTENING

    • Listen to a podcast with explanations on how to use these tenses, from the BBC (Challenging). It includes two quizzes and a “use the grammar” section with examples from other students and feedback about their mistakes.
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

 

GRAMMAR

  • Oxford Practice Grammar – Basic (i-G-Lb-02.44) Unit 16  p. 34-35
  • Grammar Express – Intermediate (i-G-Lb-02.32) Unit 14 p. 58-61
  • Focus on Grammar 3 – Workbook (i-G-Lb-02.41) Unit 19  p. 89-93
  • Test it, Fix it. – Verbs & Tenses – Pre-intermediate (i-G-Lb-02.37) Pages 18-21

 

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English for Specific Academic Purposes

These are faculty-specific resources for Higher Education studies, aimed for Upper-Intermediate students.

Garnet Education: English for Specific Academic Purposes
Garnet Education: English for Specific Academic Purposes

 

The website consists of a collection of links on various topics relevant to the study of the discipline. There are links to unit-related material, professional bodies, language resources and supplementary topics.

Garnet Education: English for Specific Academic Purposes

Garnet Education: English for Specific Academic Purposes

The areas of study include:

  • Agribusiness and agriculture
  • Banking
  • Business
  • Economics
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Science
  • ICT
  • Language and linguistics
  • Management
  • Medicin
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Medicine
  • Psychology
  • Public Relations
  • Tourism and hospitality

Go to the website, select your area of study, and visit the links. You’ll practice your listening with the videos and your reading. Learn new vocabulary and read about your favorite topics. Practice your English in your professional field.

Present Perfect for Beginners

The present perfect is formed by the verb “have” and the past participle of the verb:

“I have been to Guadalajara.”

The basic use for this tense is to talk about things that happened in the past, up until now. It doesn’t matter when that happened, or how many times, or how long ago. The only thing that matters is: that it happened 😀

It’s used to talk about previous experiences, specially in this way:

“Have you ever visited Disneyland?”
“Yes, I have.”

GRAMMAR EXPLANATION:

Here are some suggestions to practice:

READING

LISTENING

SPEAKING

  • Conversation corner card B-11 “Let’s make a date”

GRAMMAR

These are materials and resources that we have in the SALC:

  • Essential Grammar in Use, unit 17 (Present Perfect, p 44-45)
  • Just American Edition i-G-Lb-02.47, unit 19 (Present Perfect, p 55-56)
  • Focus on Grammar 3, third edition (i-G-Lb-02.41), unit 18 (Present Perfect, pages 202-211). It includes listening activities. Ask for the CD. For more practice, use the Workbook (i-G-Ct-02.41), also unit 18, pages 85 to 88.

ONLINE PRACTICE

  • Present Perfect 2: Irregular Past Participles. To make the present perfect, you need to use HAVE + PAST PARTICIPLE. The past participles of most verbs are formed using -ED, but some common verbs have unusual past participles. In this exercise, you can test your knowledge of irregular past participles.
    http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/courses/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/pperf2.htm